SQ3Tsya’yay: Weaver’s Spirit Power – Final Month for Exhibit

8th
Jan / 2012

Exhibit open until January 29, 2012.

SQ3Tsya’yay is pronounced “cut-see-ya-ya” and means “Weaver’s Spirit Power.” Master weaver and weaving teacher sa’hLa mitSa (Susan Pavel) will discuss the exhibit, which includes blankets and textiles. Guests can try their hand at weaving and touch samples that include rare mountain goat wool.

ADDRESS & PHONE NUMBER
1680 East 15th Ave, Eugene, OR 97403
(541) 346-3024

EXHIBIT HOURS
Wednesday through Sunday, 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

OFFICE HOURS
Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

ADMISSION
General Admission – $3
FREE admission to the public each Wednesday.
Seniors (62+) – $2
Youth (3-18) – $2
Families (2 adults and up to 4 youth) – $8
Children (2 and under) – Free
MNCH Members, UO Students, Faculty, and Staff – Free with ID

http://natural-history.uoregon.edu/exhibits/sq3tsyayay-weavers-spirit-power

More details also available on the University of Oregon events calendar.

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SQ3Tsya’yay: Weaver’s Spirit Power – Official Opening

30th
Sep / 2011

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2011
MNCH Members-Only Reception, 5:00–6:00 p.m. Free Public Reception, 6:00–8:00 p.m.

SQ3Tsya’yay is pronounced “cut-see-ya-ya” and means “Weaver’s Spirit Power.” Master weaver and weaving teacher sa’hLa mitSa (Susan Pavel) will discuss the exhibit, which includes blankets and textiles. Guests can try their hand at weaving and touch samples that include rare mountain goat wool.

1680 E. 15th Avenue, Eugene · 541-346-3024

http://natural-history.uoregon.edu/exhibits/sq3tsyayay-weavers-spirit-power

More details also available on the University of Oregon events calendar.

 

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In Belfair, Saying Thanks to the Salmon » Kitsap Sun

12th
Sep / 2010

Eight-year-old Dylan Adams, left, of Belfair Learns hot to do Coast Salish tribal weaving from Susan Pavel. PHOTO BY LARRY STEAGALL

Eight-year-old Dylan Adams, left, of Belfair learns how to do Coast Salish tribal weaving from Susan Pavel of Skokomish, who is married to a Skokomish Tribal member. The weaving was to be given to Al Adams of the salmon center. (LARRY STEAGALL | KITSAP SUN)

via In Belfair, Saying Thanks to the Salmon » Kitsap Sun.

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Susan’s Work Listed as ‘One of 25 Greatest Works of Art Ever Made in Seattle’

28th
Mar / 2009

From The Stranger:

Susan Pavel, du’kWXaXa’t3w3l (Sacred Change for Each Other), 2007

No list like this would make any sense without native art, and yet most everything that passes for the native art of Seattle is actually art from hundreds of miles north of here. Only in the last few decades have the Salish-speaking people, the real native people of this coastal-turned-urban region, begun to reclaim their lost and undervalued traditions. This mountain-goat-hair robe—the first such robe to be made in a century—woven and hand dyed with native plants by Susan Pavel, is not just a robe: It is a she, a feminine entity with a mission, as one Skokomish spiritual leader says. She (robe) commemorates the “sacred change” of rediscovering Salish ways and is meant to inspire future generations. The vertical dashes are backbones, urging strength even in struggle; the tied ends on the robe’s fringes are a reminder not to leave things undone. She is a soft monument.

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Seattle Times: Blanket Brings “Sacred Change”

31st
Jan / 2007

From the Seattle Times Jan 28, 2007:

Revered elder Vi Hilbert of the Upper Skagit tribe, seated, is assisted by Susan Pavel in donning the Coast Salish mountain-goat-hair blanket Pavel wove. Photo by Alan Berner - Seattle Times


With prayer and song, tribal members from around the region Saturday named and blessed the first known hand-twined mountain-goat-hair blanket made in Puget Sound country in generations.

The art was retained by a few master weavers, including the late Bruce Miller, a Skokomish spiritual leader known as subiyay, who passed the art on to his apprentice, Susan Pavel. Pavel, who made the blanket, brought it out in a joyous ceremony at the longhouse at The Evergreen State College. The one-of-a-kind blanket will hang in the new addition of the Seattle Art Museum, which is scheduled to open in May. Read More »

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SQ3Tsya’yay: Weaver’s Spirit Power

1st
Sep / 2006

From the WSU Museum of Anthropology:

Examples of rare Coast Salish textile weaving, part of the traveling exhibit SQ3Tsya’yay: Weaver’s Spirit Power, were on display at the Museum of Anthropology in fall 2006. The pieces were woven by Susan Pavel, who led a public demonstration and presentation about Salish weaving as part of WSU’s Art a la Carte series.

“Not only are the works visually stunning,” said Barbara Brotherton, curator of Native American art at the Seattle Art Museum, “but collectively they tell a story about a dedicated individual who has embarked on a life’s mission to bring back something cherished. She honors the ancestors and her community by following this path. It is a tribute to the resilience of Native people and Native art.” Read More »

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